Robin Hawke


Genteel
January 3, 2012, 9:49 PM
Filed under: All Writing Challenges | Tags: ,

Maxine, disenchanted and bored, visited a vintage dress shop. She tried every garment that fit, swirling down narrow aisles in impossible collars. Upon her choice—a revealing dress, cinched cerise—she devised her plans to abandon quotidian underwear, wondering how many dates would glimpse the saucy nutmegs from the fifties.

Click to read entries...quotidian prompt...

Advertisements

13 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Oh, now that is a wonderful vignette!

Comment by Shadlyn

Thank you, loved that you chose to call it a vignette, so in keeping, Robin

Comment by Robin Hawke

Ha! I love it. I looked up quotidian, and said, “Nah.” Nice one!

http://charleslmashburn.wordpress.com/2012/01/03/be-careful-what-you-ask-for/

Comment by charlesmashburn

Thank goodness for the dictionary that’s always a click away.

Thanks!

Comment by Robin Hawke

Thanks for the new word, “quotidian,” I had to look to look it up. Excellent use of the term and a wonderful piece of writing.

Comment by snagglewordz

I think I got away with cerise because of quotidian. It was a fun one to write. Thanks!

Comment by Robin Hawke

Another great “quotidian” piece. It’s just so darn fun to say too. 😀 I love the part about “saucy nutmegs.”

Comment by Sonia G Medeiros

This conjured up some great visuals; really lovely written Robin!

Comment by yikici

[…] a special shout out and thank you to Robin Hawke and JM McDowell. I’m very lucky to have received the Versatile Blogger Award from these […]

Pingback by Gifts and re-gifts, from a grouch to a grin « Snagglewordz

[…] Genteel by Robin Hawke […]

Pingback by February Writing Challenge: Of Love and Leap Years | Sonia G Medeiros

A beautiful piece. Moreover, you used two unique words (I count your use of nutmegs as well as quotidian. I’ve never seen it used in that way – maybe I should get out more 🙂

Comment by tkguthat

You won’t find this use of nutmeg anywhere else; I was having fun! After I wrote the piece, I looked up the etymology (Old French nois muguede, based on Latin nux ‘nut’ + late Latin muscus ‘musk.’) and it worked, so I left nutmeg alone. The prompt word was quotidian, so I can’t claim any pats on the back for that one!

Comment by Robin Hawke

No, no. You used quotidian very well I thought. You definitely deserve pats on the back for that! And we’ll just have to add your use of nutmegs to Websters and the OED 🙂

Comment by tkguthat




Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s



%d bloggers like this: